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Tuesday, April 18, 2017, 21:16

Moisturizing masks: The costlier may not be better

By chinadailyasia.com

HONG KONG – One moisturizing mask that costs more than HK$100 ($12.86) may be worse in moisturizing efficacy than one worth less than HK$20, Hong Kong’s consumer rights watchdog disclosed on Tuesday.

The Consumer Council studied 40 models of masks in the market which claimed to be excellent skin moisturizers but just six scored four on the five-point scale. Among the six, five cost less than HK$20 per piece.

The most expensive mask studied by the council, from French brand Lancome, cost HK$108.3 per piece but scored just three points on the scale.

The council’s Research and Testing Committee Chairman Wong Kam-fai concluded there was no direct link between a product’s price and quality, warning customers not to judge a product only by its brand and price.

The most expensive mask studied by the council, from French brand Lancome, cost HK$108.3 per piece but scored just three points on the scale

Meanwhile, the council also found out that half the 40 moisturizing masks contained preservatives such as parabens and methylisothiazolinone (MIT), which might lead to skin allergy.

A moisturizing mask from French brand Besilke had MIT levels exceeding the mandatory limit on the Chinese mainland.

Consumer Council Chief Executive Gilly Wong Fung-han said Hong Kong had not established standards to test MIT density, and could only rely on foreign standards when it came to MIT testing.

Wong Kam-fai said it was difficult to say what effect the preservatives would have as people reacted to them in different ways. He suggested customers apply the fluid inside the mask package to their cheeks first and see if it causes any irritation.

In a separate study, the council found that sugar added to yogurt products sold in the city was not clearly listed on product labels.

After testing 45 yogurt products, the council found a five-fold difference in sugar contents.

One product, with 18 grams of sugar per hundred grams, topped the chart. The council noted that one pot of such yogurt supplied 60 percent of the daily maximum sugar consumption recommended by the World Health Organization.

Wong Kam-fai said the council was concerned about the limited disclosure on added sugar and suggested manufacturers optimize product labels in order to prevent excessive sugar intake by customers.

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