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Thursday, October 6, 2016, 17:02

HK scientist almost there for chemistry Nobel

By Xinhua

HK scientist almost there for chemistry Nobel
Dennis Lo Yuk-ming, A ssociate D ean of the Medical Faculty at The Chinese University of Hong Kong. ( Photo / cuhk.edu.hk)

HONG KONG - Hong Kong was almost there to bag a Nobel chemistry prize medal this year; however, tipped as a potential winner, Hong Kong scientist Dennis Yuk-ming Lo missed out on the prestigious award, just as he expected.

"Really, I dare not to think about it," Lo, associate dean of the Medical Faculty at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, said to Xinhua before the announcement of the Nobel Prize results. "There are many superior scientists in the world and there are many important findings. All we need to do is to do our part."

Dennis Lo Yuk-ming was awarded the Future Science Prize - Life Science Prize and named this year's Thomson Reuters Citation Laureate

This year's chemistry prize went to Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir Fraser Stoddart and Bernard Feringa.

Although he failed to take home the Nobel Prize, Lo's study has already had a great impact on medical development and his persistence in scientific research has set a good example for young people.

In September, the medical professor was awarded the Future Science Prize - Life Science Prize, seen as the Chinese version of Nobel Prize, and named this year's Thomson Reuters Citation Laureate - Chemistry for his achievement in detecting cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma, cited as a revolution in non-invasive prenatal testing.

According to scientific research citation data on the platform Web of ScienceTM, 14 research papers that Lo has published on non-invasive prenatal diagnosis have been cited over 6,000 times since 1997.

The annual Citation laureates study identifies the most influential science researchers who are considered as potential winners of the Nobel Prize in the near future.

"I'm delighted that my study has drawn international attention," which, Lo said, will do good to Hong Kong's development in scientific research and Hong Kong is promising in nurturing scientific talents.

HK scientist almost there for chemistry Nobel
Dennis Lo Yuk-ming is good at interpreting complicated scientific theories in simple terms. ( Frentee Ji / China Daily)

In recent years, Lo said, the number of Hong Kong scientists being elected to international scientific academies climbs, forming a positive momentum; the increase in government's support and donations from different circles all will benefit Hong Kong's scientific research on the whole.

Also teaching in the medical school, Lo is happy to see that more and more students are willing to throw themselves into the research field. "What young people have is time, simply go and try," Lo said, adding that it is important for scientists to have an international perspective.

He encouraged young people to seize the chance for overseas exchanges and bring back what they have learnt to Hong Kong.

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