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Friday, February 28, 2014, 09:01
Finding someone who cares
By Li Yao

Finding someone who cares

Parents and their foster children have a gathering and enjoy outdoor activities organized by the Hong Kong Family Welfare Society, a fostering organization.

Finding someone who cares
A rewarding challenge

Pinky Chow, 50, a foster mother to more than 30 children since 2006, knows all too well fostering can be a trying but rewarding experience. One boy, Long Long, came at the age of 3 in June 2012, full of anger over his natural mother’s abandonment.

Long Long’s parents were filing for divorce, and neither paid attention to their only son. In one provocative attempt to enrage the father, Long Long’s mother brought him to an office building, abandoned the boy, then took off alone.

Pinky recalls when Long Long first arrived, he was thin and malnourished, was slow to learn to speak, but had a violent temper. He would kick and scream, and even bite Pinky and her husband.

Pinky said she understood Long Long’s guardedness and anger. “He felt like a ball, being kicked around by his parents. Only neither of them wants him. Suddenly he found himself having to live in my house, and in his mind, he was asking ‘who are you? Why am I going to listen to you?’”

Long Long stayed 16 months at Pinky’s home. When he left last October, he was a happier kid. He enjoyed kindergarten, and was more confident. He would give Pinky a warm hug when coming home. What did the trick? Pinky acknowledges trainings by the Social Welfare Department help a lot. What is also put to test is her patience and perseverance to deal with Long Long’s emotions and reassure him that he is in a safe, caring environment.

“There is no better reward than seeing all these wonderful changes in the children I fostered, and knowing that I earned their trust and helped to make some difference,” she said.

Contact the writer at liyao@chinadaily.com.cn

 

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